dating buy sell ie - Dating rituals in ethiopia

The tiny atamo is most frequently played at weddings and festivals, setting the rhythmic beat of folk songs and dances.Ingera is made from a cereal grain that is unique known as Tef.

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Ethiopia is truly a Land of discovery - brilliant and beautiful, secretive, mysterious and extraordinary.

Above all things, it is a country of great antiquity, with a culture and traditions dating back more than 3,000 years.

National dress is usually worn for festivals, when streets and meeting-places are transformed into a sea of white as finely woven cotton dresses, wraps decorated with coloured woven borders, and suits are donned.

A distinctive style of dress is found among the Oromo horsemen of the central highlands, who, on ceremonial days such as Maskal, attire themselves in lions' manes or baboon-skin headdresses and, carrying hippo-hide spears and shields, ride down to the main city squares to participate in the parades.

Other instruments include the begena, a huge, multi-stringed lyre often referred to as the Harp of David; the tsinatseil, or sistrum, which is used in church music; the meleket, a long trumpet without fingerholes, and the embilta, a large, simple, one-note flute used on ceremonial occasions.

Though often simply made, the massinko can, in the hands of an expert musician, produces a wide variety of melodies.

The Tigrigna- and Amharic-speaking people of the north and centre of the country are mainly agriculturalists, tilling the soil with ox-drawn ploughs and growing teff (a local millet), wheat, barley, maize and sorghum.

The most southerly of the Semitic speakers, the Gurage, are also farmers and herders, but many are also craftsmen.

Singing accompanies many agricultural activities, as well as religious festivals and ceremonies surrounding life's milestones - birth, marriage and death.

Traditional musical instruments in widespread use include the massinko, a one-stringed violin played with a bow; the krar, a six-stringed lyre, played with the fingers or a plectrum; the washint, a simple flute; and three types of drum - the negarit (kettledrum), played with sticks, the kebero, played with the hands, and the atamo, tapped with the fingers or palm.

Ethiopians are justifiably proud of the range of their traditional costumes.

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