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That was the 1990s, and Riccardi was into grunge and metal music, video games, and computers.

He’d chat about Nirvana, search for guitar tabs, trade shareware, and find opponents for . That year, AOL Instant Messenger launched, born out of the Buddy List feature in AOL.

Users could also create private and public chatrooms and host scheduled events.

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While her children don’t use AOL anymore, she’s kept it up.

Her favorite room is “Garden Chat,” where she trades tips on how to grow vegetables and flowers.

At the pinnacle of AOL, the company had 35 million paying subscribers. When it was still called Quantum Computer Services, the company debuted chatrooms.“That was a huge focus of the service,” Joe Schober, who was a beta tester at Quantum Computing Services in the late 1980s and officially worked for AOL from 1992 to 2014, tells Regular chat rooms could hold up to 23 people.

“Auditorium” chatrooms could hold hundreds or thousands of users and had a moderator.

“It was really cool, because even if your parents were in the next room, they couldn’t hear what you were talking about because you’re typing on your keyboard.”At AOL’s peak, more than 100 million AOL screen names existed, and users spent over a million hours chatting a year.

Of course, celebrities were involved in this new way to connect with the fans.

Frequent, longtime users — it seems to mostly be the elderly — who log on to chat about gardening have increasingly been met with trolls who start arguments about President Donald Trump.

And yes, there are people — unsure about Tinder — looking for love.

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A 1993 Associated Press story even describes how then-President Bill Clinton was considering holding a town hall on AOL.

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